Posted on Jan 12, 2015
TSgt Food Service Nco
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In the Air Force we don't have WO's, but I try to have a basic understanding of other branches so that when I encounter them I know how they wish to be addressed, etc. (example: every Air Force NCO I've encountered has been fine with being addressed as sir or ma'am, but I've encountered Army NCO's who clearly don't like being addressed as sir or ma'am) So, what grades of WO does your branch use (I know Navy doesn't use them all)? What rank/paygrade do they have to reach before they can become a WO? How do their job duties differ from SNCO's or Officers? How does their amount of responsibility differ from SNCO's or Officers? What is the proper way to address a Warrant Officer (sir/ma'am, Chief, "hey you")? Does the term of address differ depending on their paygrade? What is the process if a WO wished to become a Commissioned Officer? And anything else that is unique to WO's in your branch? And my apologies if this is too long/too many questions.
Posted in these groups: Warrant_officers_logo Warrant Officers
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Responses: 17
CW5 Sam B.
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Edited 3 y ago
In the Army the technical warrant officer is usually an NCO with a stellar performance record and a minimum E5/6 learning his field before becoming a warrant. The flight warrant on the other hand can come right off the street with no military back ground whatsoever and become a warrant. The selection rate for flight used to be 60% active duty regardless of service and was changed a few years ago in a attempt to get to an accession of 60% civilian. However recruiters don't like the time and effort it takes to produce an application for a warrant. Tale of tech versus aviation in the Army. Sir, ma'am, mister is standard with chief being usually less desired.
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CW4 Jet Aircraft Pilot
CW4 (Join to see)
6 y
Is the goal really 60% civilian accessions? Do you know what the reason/logic for that is?
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CW5 Sam B.
CW5 Sam B.
6 y
Keith, allow me to elaborate, not technical fields as they require prior knowledge and experience, it is the aviation branch and the reason is the attrition rate of prior NCOs with a myriad of issues.
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CW5 Sam B.
CW5 Sam B.
3 y
SPC Frank Blunt - Have you made it yet?
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LT Regional Practice Manager, Hwsl
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Edited 6 y ago
In the Coast Guard, the Chief Warrant Officer is a technical expert selected from candidates who apply that are rated from E7-9, although E6s who are on the upper 50% of the Chief's(E7) advancement list are able to apply. There are very few Chief Warrant Officers that I know of that were selected as E6s, as points are provided for time as E7 and above that are not available for E6s. I was a Senior Chief when I was selected(E8) for MED2 (Medical CWO2).

There is no education requirement for selection to Chief Warrant Officer, although it can be taken into account. I had my AA when I was selected. I complete my BA in six weeks.

In the Coast Guard, we only have CWO2-4. There are no W-1s or CWO5s, although we are allocated for them. In my branch, all grades of Warrant Officer are Commissioned Officers. We are addressed by Sir/Ma'am or CWO. Chief Warrant Officers do not salute one another, regardless of our rank. A CWO2 and CWO4 are seen as equals.

We have a CWO to LT (O3E) program that I will apply for in a couple of years. My goal is to obtain 40 years of service and retire as a Commander(O5). We shall see what fate has in store!

I hope that I explained things better.
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Capt Richard P.
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Edited 6 y ago
In the Marine Corps they are technical experts nominated and then promoted by boards from the E6 E7 range, then sent to The Basic School, just like Marine 2ndLts. They are supposed to run specialized shops and not be put in combat leadership positions regularly...but they're Marines.... so they end up there more often than not.

And you address them by their rank (but not number) and name. "Warrant Officer Smith" or "Chief Warrant Officer Jones" if you're equal or senior and "Sir or "Ma'am" if junior. Some Officers will call them by first names, but I rarely will out of respect, unless they're close friends and it's a private setting.
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CWO2 Shelby DuBois
CWO2 Shelby DuBois
6 y
And... the original Marine Warrant Officers were either Quartermaster or Weapons skill sets. The Quatermasters handled supply and payroll issues whereas the Weapons WO's were to be the duty expert on anything that belched metal and smoke. The weapons WO's were differentiated by a bursting bomb insignia collar device and often referred to as "Gunner". A WO was "appointed' by the Sec of Navy then "Commissioned'by the President, upon promotion to Chief Warrant Officer. With all due respect to the Naval service, never call a Marine Warrant Officer 'Chief'... While "Gunner" is used officially by bursting bomb wearing CWO's... most all Warrant Officers use the moniker these days...
Civilians are always confusing "Gunner' and "Gunny" by the way.. Thanks, Agent Gibbs.
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Sgt Wayne Horton
Sgt Wayne Horton
>1 y
I am so happy to hear about the bursting bombs, I served under two gunners with that insignia, and they are also lifetime friends. one more note, never once go in front of a gunner without your knowledge in hand. really good advice.
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