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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Sep 25, 2014
CPT Company Commander
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MSgt Explosive Ordnance Disposal
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Here is the common theme I see in alot of these posts. The Army folks come on these forums looking for answers to leadership problems and challenges where as, the Marines come here to watch the show. We in the Marine Corps will keep things in house and fix it. I see alot of dirty laundry on Rally Point. You see an issue you correct it, don't go past it and then post the problems on a message board. I'm pretty sure even in the Army you have SNCO's in your units with vast experiance which you can gain invaluable knowledge from without coming to an open forum. This my friends is where Esprit de corps begins, because this is how your troops will see that you actually care about self improvement, troop growth, and unit cohesion.
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SSG Physical Security Nco
SSG (Join to see)
7 y
I don't see NCOs coming to RP to "air dirty laundry". I see as we are better at communicating our emotions and feelings. We're all humans you know? Can I get a hug please?
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SGT Michael Glenn
SGT Michael Glenn
7 y
awwwwwwwwwww......hugs to you !!!!! I have milk and cookies too !!!!!!!!
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SFC Brigade Cbrn Nco
SFC (Join to see)
7 y
Well put, SSG Leonard J W.. There are good in bad in all branches. Toxic leadership is unavoidable. All we can do is try and flush those people out and keep the good ones.
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CW3 Kevin Storm
CW3 Kevin Storm
4 y
With respect, I don't look at any branch of service, or sub division of a service with any envy. I see flaws in my own branch, what I see in some branches other than the Army are a lot of false bravado, false history, and riding on the backs of other services and taking credit for it. You will never fix anything if you consider it to be true, when in fact it is false. When you perpetuate a lie or semi truth into becoming a cult like dogma with mythical status, and then get insulted, offended, to the point of wanting to fight of the falsehood you have turned into a mythical being, defacto showed the flaw at its worst. We as a branch have gotten past that phase and now working to improve it.
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CSM First Sergeant
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This is a direct result of a failure in NCO leadership and discipline. Soldiers do what they are taught and told to do. That is their primary function. It is the job of NCOs to teach and instill discipline, duty, honor and esprit de corps. NCOs need to start looking at their peers and subordinates and most importantly, themselves. If you cannot lead or teach...YOU, the NCO are the problem.
It is a shameful and telling situation when an officer has to start pointing out the discipline problems of enlisted soldiers. That soldiers first line leader is a failure, period. Our NCO Corps needs to check itself immediately. I'm embarrassed just reading this.
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SSG Maurice P.
SSG Maurice P.
7 y
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CPL Hicks my brother i know the feeling,the first time i tried the Marine Corps i didnt make it...when i tried it a second time i finally graduated from Parris Island, i weighed 115 lbs and thought i could kick king kongs ass and tried afew times and usually lost hehehehehehehehe oohrah
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Cpl Ehr Specialist
Cpl (Join to see)
7 y
MSgt (Join to see) I work as a project manager in healthcare, which means I interface with providers and staff all the time. If there is one thing I have learned is that the majority of providers I have dealt with only care about what is convenient, not necessarily what is right. Trying to get them to convert to Electronic Records is like herding cats while nailing jello the wall. They are all over the place and it is a mess.
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Cpl Ehr Specialist
Cpl (Join to see)
7 y
SSG Maurice P. I found it amazing how fast an NCO could "negotiate" an adjustment. I had a SSgt I really looked up to and modeled myself after. He was pretty old school, he took great care of his troops and looked after them well. But when you did something stupid, all hell broke loose. Once corrected back to business. He was swift, direct, violent and correct (even when was incorrect).
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SSG Maurice P.
SSG Maurice P.
7 y
Yes indeed my brother i knew afew of them..........
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MSgt Electrical Power Production
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The Sword More than a weapon — a heritage The swords Marines carry signify the Marine Corps’ heritage as America’s original protectors. They are the oldest weapons still in service by United States Armed Forces. Officers carry the Mameluke sword, which was originally given to Lieutenant Presley O’Bannon in 1805 by a Mameluke chieftain in North Africa. Lt O’Bannon and his Marines marched across 600 miles of North African desert to rid the "shores of Tripoli" of pirates. By 1825, all Marine Corps Officers carried the Mameluke sword. Staff Noncommissioned Officers (SNCO) and Noncommissioned Officers (NCO) carry the 1858 Cavalry sword. This sword was bestowed upon them by the Commandant of the Marine Corps in recognition of their leadership in combat, their virtue and tradition. Only the Marine Corps awards such recognition to Noncommissioned Officers.

THE MOST DISTINCTIVE UNIFORM IN THE MILITARY Every detail of the dress blues uniform reflects the proud legacy of Marines who have served for more than two centuries: The buttons featuring the eagle and anchor have been on the uniform since 1804, making them the oldest military insignia in continued use. The "blood stripe" runs down each trouser leg of the dress blues worn by noncommissioned officers, staff noncommissioned officers and officers. The solid red stripe became part of the uniform in 1849. Today, it serves to honor the memory of fallen comrades. The collar of today’s dress blues reflects the original Marine uniform of the American Revolution, which had a high leather neck to help protect Marines from sword blows. Because it embodies Marine Corps history, rigorous standards apply to wearing this uniform and every Marine upholds those standards with pride.
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Cpl David McQueen
Cpl David McQueen
7 y
You are absolutely right about the feeling of being a Marine NCO. I just wish I appreciated it then as much as I do now.

I am happy to hear of your success in life, with a little aid from the Corps. I, too, have been using what the Corps has taught me to find my path.

Best of luck. It was great hearing from you. I'll be here.

Semper Fi brother.
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SSG Maurice P.
SSG Maurice P.
7 y
My brothers, Msgt Borders and Cpl McQueen i too owe the corps...if it wasn't for it i could never do the things i do at my Civillian job...OOHRAH and SEMPER FI
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Cpl Jeff N.
Cpl Jeff N.
7 y
MSgt (Join to see) . All of this sword and esprit de corps talk is making me want to reenlist...Unfortunately I am a paunch 52 year old. I do have my NCO sword on display in my study. It reminds me of days gone by and the esprit de corp of our Marine Corps.
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CW3 Kevin Storm
CW3 Kevin Storm
4 y
Go back and read the history of the United States long before there was a Corp of anything the Militias of Briton and Spain were defending their respective Colonies. Remind me again how many Marines were at Lexington and Concord? I can count the number on hand and still have five fingers to spare. How many were picked up arms in Prince Phillips War? Total Count of US Marines at Yorktown, Saratoga, the fall of Fort Ticonderoga, Siege of Boston, Brandywine, Cowpens? How many Army Divisions were at the taking of Mexico City compared to one brigade of the USMC. Sorry a whole lot happened prior to 1825 and after. Seven marines and two officers did not take Tripoli, they took a small coastal town with a combined force of 400 Arab and Greek Mercenaries. Also there are no factual accounts/records of the sword ever being presented. Something that has been of debate for a long time.
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