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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Mar 1, 2017
PO2 Gerry Tandberg
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COL Mikel J. Burroughs
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Edited >1 y ago
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RP Members and Connections - Great discussion and post on PTSD by PO2 Gerry Tandberg - Please pass this onto many of your connections here on RallyPoint.


CAPT Michael MoranPO3 Bob McCord CAPT John Fristachi SPC Kenneth OsborneSFC LaTonya Ramos, Human Resource(HRBP) | United States Army SFC (Retired)| Military Breastfeeding Advocate|Certified Just Culture ChampionPO3 Ron Hinton SPC Doug MessickSPC Scott MarcelleSPC Saundra Teater SSG Kevin Flike







https://www.rallypoint.com/answers/what-i-learned-about-post-traumatic-stress
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SSG Disabled Veteran
SSG (Join to see)
>1 y
MSgt Victor Moss - It is a DISORDER, as in POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER. If you can't work because you have a mental disorder that is where you are
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PVT Mark Brown
PVT Mark Brown
>1 y
SFC (Join to see) - that
is where education takes over
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PVT Mark Brown
PVT Mark Brown
>1 y
SSG (Join to see) -
it has become common to drop the "disorder" and refer to it as post traumatic STRESS. Note: stress is the operative word rather than disorder.
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SSG Disabled Veteran
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A disorder is a grade of condition. A few years ago someone wanted to reclassify in the DSM, PTSD as a psychosis. That would cause it to be treated as a serious condition.No one with Post Traumatic Stress Psychosis could have a gun and wouldn't be in the Military, has been around since before the Army would acknowledge PTSD. Originally,The Army rated me for a ""Anxiety Disorder"" but a well regarded university called it Combat Related Stress Disorder. So stop dropping the Disorder
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SFC David Hawk
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I've been coping for ten years now. When I returned from the desert in January 2008, I had no knowledge of PTSD. No one informed me at my debriefing of what I was going to expect when returning. It wasn't until about two years after I returned that my wife threatened to leave me if I didn't get help. So I went to the VA and got some help, some tools, and more knowledge of what to expect. I still have triggers, memories, a nightmare from time to time, but I live with them. I have somewhat adapted. When I first returned, I met an old Vietnam Vet and talked to him about the memories, and if they ever stop. He told me that they don't, that you have to learn to accept what you did, and get on with your life. This, I have tried to do, and I try every day. I cope, and I avoid my triggers as much as possible. I believe I can help others with the same issues, and will do so if asked.
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SSgt Ron Dexter
SSgt Ron Dexter
>1 y
SFC David Hawk Thank you for sharing. It is disheartening to read the Army did not properly make you aware of what could happen and what signs to look for. I hope you continue to learn new skills so you can live your best life possible! This I hope for you and all your combat Veteran brothers and sisters
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PO1 Bill O
PO1 Bill O
>1 y
The hardest part of this condition is that no one but you really knows what you feel, when you feel it, and how to avoid triggering its ugly memory! One day there will be a tested medical medicine or therapy to stop this disease. The problem is that man keeps searching, he does not include proven results because competition gets in the way, egos abound, and then the learnt concepts become overlooked because technology is passing them by. Man has already found the answer to this problem. Love each other, and stop warring!
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SFC Mike Terry
SFC Mike Terry
3 y
I was in Vietnam and my PTSD didn't really kick in till I was in my early sixties. The VA has helped a lot. just knowing what is wrong with you helps. So hang in their Sgt Hawk, cause it never completely goes away.
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AN Christopher Crayne
AN Christopher Crayne
3 y
I did the TMS in Nevada. Trans Magnetic Stimulation. It consists of about 48 min. + - ,each person differs, of magnetic pulses like the MRI into a specific area of the brain that depression stores/exists. They pulse that area and watch your hand. When all the fingers stop jerking and only the thumb moves, they found the spot. They laser measure the spot for accurate placement for future visits.You take about 3,000 pulses in that session time . Your eyes and teeth rattle a bit. Tenderness to the head where pulsed. And that's one down and twenty nine more to go,daily, thirty days in a row. The results for myself although temporary, (around 4 months) improved my overall mood and lessened the depression. I found it a worthwhile experience.
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MSG Mechanic Trainee
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great post I have heard many other people say that PTSD is not a disease but in fact an injury, to the mind and psyche, I'm 50% through proper meds and counselling I can lead a some what normal life, but the fact is, its an injury just like my blown out knee, the injury still exists, the treatment is palliative at best
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MSG Mechanic Trainee
MSG (Join to see)
>1 y
MSgt Victor Moss - I totally agree we are guinea pigs to these people that have not been in our boots, experienced our traumas but they are the ones treating us, fortunately my current psych doc who seems to be more in tune with PTS, has gotten me on the correct drugs and dosages which have improved my overall life, and yes knowing your triggers and dealing with them is also important, as well as how to avoid those triggers, its a combination of medication and education and over all excepting the fact you are not the same person you were
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CWO3 Retired
CWO3 (Join to see)
>1 y
MSG (Join to see) - I'm not a psychiatrist nor a professional medical doctor, but I know personally what I've been through during my time in the Marine Corps. I've had physical injuries on top of head injuries. I've been with Artillery, Infantry, Signal Intelligence, Amtracs, Tanks, and Division and MEB Staff Officer. But I will never forget the times that I held a seriously wounded Marine, whether it be peacetime combat ops or the real deal. I somehow knew when I returned from any ops how I would react to my family. Especially after being in combat and not wanting my family to know what I went through. As everyone here mentioned we all can see the physical injuries and wounds, but not the serious ones and injuries that will affect you for life. I've been very blessed to come back a survivor but sometimes I wish I hadn't. I have been in counseling therapy with my psychiatrist since my last employment. That was 7 years ago. I deal with my nightmares by eating right, getting the right hours of sleep, and especially exercising. But my thoughts and Nightmares haven't gone away, but like many Marines who have been diagnosed with this injury, disease, disorder whatever you want to call or name it, it will always be a part of my life and my wife and son's. I'm just happy that they understand me and my difficulties that comes with the silent injuries that we all take for granted. I know this Marine will never take life for granted ever again. I'd rather be the same Marine that I was prior to my very first incident during an op in South Korea. Thanks for sharing all your thoughts and opinions. I know I can get through this obstacle one day at a time and hopefully you all will too! I've been diagnosed with this disorder or injury since 1992 unofficial, but officially since 2010. I'm still doing what I do everyday surviving like we all do.

Semper Fidelis, To all who gave their best
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MSG Mechanic Trainee
MSG (Join to see)
>1 y
MSgt Terry Swift - very interesting, I've tried acupuncture, CBT, my meds well they work for now, my family bailed, could'nt deal with it anymore, even with my meds and CBT I still have the nightmares, but their effect on me are lessoned, i'm functional at work, I work out every day and eat well, I retired 3 years ago from the USAR, one last reminder to scratch from my thoughts, yes I miss it, but it needed to be done, as you said one day at a time that's all we can do
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CPO Bill Penrod
CPO Bill Penrod
3 y
I am one of the lucky one from Vietnam because I've manage to put my PTSD asleep most of the time. It's there just dormat for now.....
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