Avatar feed
Responses: 17
MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
24
24
0
Edited >1 y ago
PTSD is the most humbling and hardest experience in my life. The apex nature of PTSD was being out of control mentally and not knowing when I would feel better. I was very close to committing suicide, but my mental health team sent me to inpatient a couple times. It was a calm and safe place for me and I improved. It is truly an overwhelming experience.

I kept looking for the light in the dark tunnel and decided the model to my recovery was like Maslow's hierarchy of needs. First is what I call "Infantry Survival Skills". Eat, drink, bathe, work out, sleep. It gave me a routine as I ventured into my emotional help. Love my family, the Army, the natural beauty of earth, and my dogs. Be positive. My last stage was unpredictable because I did not know when I would cross the threshold. I had seen the light at the end of the tunnel and gravitated towards it. I am different now and focused on preventing a relapse.
(24)
Comment
(0)
MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
MAJ (Join to see)
>1 y
Please do what you what you want to do with it. Otherwise your thoughts on the paper?
(1)
Reply
(0)
MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
MAJ (Join to see)
>1 y
My birds are ok. One bird is very tame to me. I am hanging in here. My ghosts are gone. The only thing I regret is nothing really excites me anymore. I hope you and your family are doing well.
(1)
Reply
(0)
MAJ Armored Combat Command Commander
MAJ (Join to see)
>1 y
PO2 David Dunlap - All of us need a constant in a sea of variables.
(3)
Reply
(0)
PO1 Robert George
PO1 Robert George
>1 y
PO3 Craig Phillips - bet i'm not the only one who still rolls his clothes to put away! lol
(1)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
PVT Mark Zehner
19
19
0
PTSD the great equalizer!
(19)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close