Posted on May 11, 2018
SGT Medical Laboratory Specialist
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I am currently re-classing and I have a soldier that just came out of boot, I am legitimately concerned my soldier is Autistic and I have no idea what to do about this situation.........
Posted in these groups: Training CmdEms MedicalMilitary men Discharge
Edited 4 y ago
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Responses: 13
SGT Dave Tracy
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Edited 4 y ago
Step 1: Relax. Truth be told, damn near everybody falls somewhere on the spectrum.
Step 2: Nothing wrong with your concerns, just don't try arm-chair diagnosis; you're not qualified, and it won't help him/her or you. No telling what the underlying problem might be.
Step 3: If his/her behavior interferes with the mission or is dangerous, do not ignore that! Talk to your chain-of-command, go to behavioral health (or see if they're willing to go with you). If they are just odd but technically and tactically proficient, continue to work with him/her soldier to soldier; even more so if you're their team leader.
Step 4: Good luck. Okay, that's not really a "step", but there you go anyway.
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SGT Medical Laboratory Specialist
SGT (Join to see)
4 y
We work in a hospital laboratory and his actions puts patients lives at risk however there is very little chain of command at our location since we are both considered "students" I have been trying to talk to our coordinator here at the hospital but I have been in the army about as long as him and we both don't know what to do. My brother is autistic but thanks to great therapy has gotten better and they both act in very similar mannerisms.
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SSG Communications Chief (S6)
SSG (Join to see)
4 y
SGT Dave Tracy part 2 of step 1 is the best advice ever.
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LTC David Brown
LTC David Brown
>1 y
Excellent advice. Talk to the soldier to determine if he has a personal problem that maybe influencing his behavior so he can be guided to appropriate help.
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Sgt Christine Magnan
Sgt Christine Magnan
1 y
Great advice. If you want more information without involving your chain of command or to just be better informed to advocate for your soldier contact the National Autism Association or the Autism Society. Your local United Way would possibly know of local groups. Be sure to protect the person's identity if you do not have permission to share details.
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LTC Kevin B.
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1. Don't panic, and certainly don't make any knee-jerk decisions.
2. Learn about autism.
3. Get him/her some professional assistance, as needed.
4. Don't let anyone else complicate or take advantage of the situation.
5. Embrace the leadership challenge.
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CSM Darieus ZaGara
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Take a deep breath. This is relatively simple. First remind yourself you are not a doctor (unless you are). You discuss with your leadership sharing your concerns. From there your command should take over. I will say that I find it hard to believe that this would not be caught at MEPS, basic or AIT. In any case put it in the hands of your command. Thank you for your service.
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MAJ Robert (Bob) Petrarca
MAJ Robert (Bob) Petrarca
4 y
CSM, they wouldn't necessarily catch it anywhere. Autism is not something detectable in a typical sense like a blood test, its strictly behavioral observation and someone in MEPS would not observe someone long enough to think anything more then the person is "quirky". If they made it this far then they are pretty high functioning. Basic would be the most likely place that a DI would notice a-typical responses to different training situations & stresses and interact with and observe that individual.
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