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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Oct 24, 2014
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MAJ Jim Woods
187
187
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4th_bs_v_1970
I got 4 of them. Including the "V". Last one in 1970.
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Sean McPhail
Sean McPhail
>1 y
Carol Wootten - Can you post a screenshot of what you are referring to? If that is on his World War II discharge, it is probably referring to five bronze campaign stars on either his European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal or his Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal. Those would represent service in designated campaigns during the war. I would doubt very seriously that anyone was awarded five separate Bronze Star Medals during World War II since the medal was only created in 1944.
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SGT Joseph Rutigliano
SGT Joseph Rutigliano
>1 y
PO3 Jeff Troiano - I was in the army from 66 to 70. It is my understanding that a bronze star was routinely awarded after 6 months in country for service. The Silver Star was only issued for Valor. Of course I’m sure there were some case got juiced politically, but the Silver Star, second highest award after Medal of Honor, was a very respected award which evidenced combat related valor.
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SPC Johnny Strouth
SPC Johnny Strouth
1 y
How many bronze stars did you receive while you where in country? I was awarded four but they ere after six months, and under fire at different times. I was on the front line at all time I was in country in Nam. I am proud to have served my country but people still find ways to belittle all things military it seems. Many whom never saw action or friends blown to pieces ,well no use beating a dead horse as they say. People will believe and think what they want and only what they want.
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MAJ Jim Woods
MAJ Jim Woods
1 y
SPC Johnny Strouth Mine were over 2 tours. 67 - 70.
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CH (LTC) Jim Howard
118
118
0
I was in the Army long enough to get all of the basic medals including the Bronze Star Medal. I don't think medals mean that much but I was by one of my dad's friend's grave yesterday who was a Company Commander from Normandy all the way through the defeat of Germany and its occupation. On the simple brass plaque it said Captain, US Army, World War II and Bronze Star Medal. A simple understated testimony to the fact that at one point in his life, he did a good job. Soon the grass will obscure all of the letters on this simple plaque. Few will know how good a man he really was. In the end, it matters more what is in your chest than what is on it and the people who's lives we touch.
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SGM Joe Young
SGM Joe Young
3 y
Always said I never needed to brag about where I had been or what I had done in my career. Avoided wearing my ribbons as much as possible. Had a CSM who made it mandatory that all his 1SG’s had to wear them when we sat on any battalion boards.
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LCDR Robert Turner
LCDR Robert Turner
2 y
Wisdom - “In the end, it matters more what is in your chest than what is on it and the people who's lives we touch.”

Thank you Jim Howard!
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SrA Jared Hall
SrA Jared Hall
>1 y
I SSG Trevor. The last sentence says it best. I was Air Force Security Forces in Iraq attached to an Infantry unit and as an A1C was put in for an ARCOM but because I was an A1C it was downgraded so as not to make the NCOs look bad. It’s not a huge deal but I know I earned it. It’s what in the chest, not on it. I know what it means to me.
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SSgt Sam Pennock
SSgt Sam Pennock
>1 y
Damn Right. The medals dont make the man. The man makes the medals!
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COL Jason Smallfield, PMP, CFM, CM
116
116
0
Great laydown and history of the BSM but I would like to add a few points:
- It is arguable which award holds the most disdain among Soldiers. BSM is high but may not be the highestest. Other possibly high disdain awards are any of the "breathing" medals awarded by time (NDSM National Defense Service Medal), location (KDSM Korean Defense Service medal), event (HSM Humanitarian Service Medal), or campaign medals (ACMCS, ICMSC). A close second are the service ribbons (Overseas Service Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon). Collectively these awards/ribbons make Soldiers look like WWII Soviet Generals.
- There are a limited number of military awards with only broad definitions for guidance that give a wide amount of latitude to local commanders. The good news is local commanders are given a "band" to operate within but the bad news is that the "shot group" used by the commanders can vary widely.
- The above means there is a consistent effort to add more awards to the military awards. Recent examples include a retirement medal and the medal for UAV pilots that was to have been placed above the BSM in precedence (neither was implemented) along with the CAB which was implemented.
- Why an award was initiated and how it is used now usually differ. Therefore the historical awareness is informative but less useful than one would think. Look at how the Purple Heart and Congressional Medal of Honor have morphed over the years. Change itself is not necessarily a bad thing.
- Rank and responsibility. Many Soldiers (and leaders) equate rank with eligibility for award. By AR this is not true but in application there is some truth to this. For peacetime PCS awards (AAM, ARCOM, MSM, etc) I agree that scope of responsibility should be a criteria of consideration for an award. For combat awards (BSM, SS, etc), however, the act alone and not the rank should be the primary consideration.
- The solution to the award problem (as noted above by the BSM) is not to add more awards but to enable a tighter "shot" group by local commanders when they approve awards at the designated levels.
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1SG John Millan
1SG John Millan
>1 y
Thsnk you. So many SAM's are passed out now that soldiers can run out of room for subsequent award devices and rate a second if the same ribbon, a continuation page. What does that tell you about the criteria? The Army Service Ribbon is a participation award for meeting standards and it ststed the obvious. The most marginal recruit in any training cycle, even those who chapter out on an entry level discharge in under 180 days, with an unclassified discharge for inability to adjust to military life get the ASR. Even a slug with an ART 15 gets it the same as the honor graduate in the training cycle, so it us a joke of a participation award. The NCO,Professional Development Ribbon needs to go too. If you're a NCO, you HAD to have completed the required NCO Schools or you wouldn't have the stripes. Stop awarding for the obvious and meeting standards. WW2 troops were and are the Greatest Generation. They survived the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl, then won the most horrible war,in human history. After 4 years of hellish combat, they had maybe 4-5 ribbons. An Army private at AIT graduation now has 3, plus a cord and branch insignia. USAF S/Sgt, E-5 with 4 years in a 1st enlistment will have 8-10 participation awards to celebrate mediocrity, more than some USMC or Army grunts who did 2 tours in Afghanistan. It must end. I wear my full size, mounted, Stay Brute medals when I wear my class "A's" as a retired, just to avoid wearing stupid ribbons.
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CW4 Craig Urban
CW4 Craig Urban
>1 y
I did not wear all my medals. Meritorious service medal. Army commendation medal w 5 olc. Campaign medal. German sports medal. Good conduct medal.
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CW4 Craig Urban
CW4 Craig Urban
>1 y
I maxed every pt test I ever took. Maxed. 30 out of 31 ncoers. OER' s 19 out of 20 were maxed.
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Lt Col Anders Bergmann
Lt Col Anders Bergmann
>1 y
Not sure the name "Congressional Medal of Honor" is correct. Believe it's just "Medal of Honor". I think the existence of the "Congressional Medal of Honor Society" results in some confusion to the name of the medal itself.
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