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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Oct 24, 2014
CPT Company Commander
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MAJ Jim Woods
185
185
0
4th bs v 1970
I got 4 of them. Including the "V". Last one in 1970.
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MAJ Jim Woods
MAJ Jim Woods
3 y
SPC Johnny Strouth Mine were over 2 tours. 67 - 70.
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MAJ Jim Woods
MAJ Jim Woods
>1 y
SPC Johnny Strouth - All 4 of mine were between my 1st & 2nd Tours.
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SGT Lorenzo Nieto
SGT Lorenzo Nieto
>1 y
SGT Joseph Rutigliano - funny you say that I spend nine months in Vietnam before I went in a army hospital never got nothing if that is true how would I find out if I was eligible?
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A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
5 mo
SGT Lorenzo Nieto - ......
Si Naciste En Los Estados Unidos De America Del Norte, Tienes Que Haser Algo Con Sus Inglish... Es Horible...
Como Mi Espanol
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CH (LTC) Jim Howard
120
120
0
I was in the Army long enough to get all of the basic medals including the Bronze Star Medal. I don't think medals mean that much but I was by one of my dad's friend's grave yesterday who was a Company Commander from Normandy all the way through the defeat of Germany and its occupation. On the simple brass plaque it said Captain, US Army, World War II and Bronze Star Medal. A simple understated testimony to the fact that at one point in his life, he did a good job. Soon the grass will obscure all of the letters on this simple plaque. Few will know how good a man he really was. In the end, it matters more what is in your chest than what is on it and the people who's lives we touch.
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SrA Jared Hall
SrA Jared Hall
>1 y
I SSG Trevor. The last sentence says it best. I was Air Force Security Forces in Iraq attached to an Infantry unit and as an A1C was put in for an ARCOM but because I was an A1C it was downgraded so as not to make the NCOs look bad. It’s not a huge deal but I know I earned it. It’s what in the chest, not on it. I know what it means to me.
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SSgt Sam Pennock
SSgt Sam Pennock
>1 y
Damn Right. The medals dont make the man. The man makes the medals!
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SSG Bill McCoy
SSG Bill McCoy
>1 y
SGM Joe Young - As an MP, I never wore my awards after SP4. It was my opinion that the SGT and SSG stripes got more respect from young soldiers - ESPECIALLY during peacetime service - than ribbons. Even as a SP4 I only wore them while in Khakis/TW's while the dress greens had service and combat service bars.
I was told pretty recently, by a SP4 MP from our last duty station that he was especially impressed that I was the only NCO who did NOT wear ribbons. Besides, ribbons were just something a suspect could try to grab onto - for the same reason, I NEVER (ever) wore the Sam Browne "suicide strap," and ONLY clip-on ties! LOL
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A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
A1C Medrick "Rick" DeVaney
5 mo
A Man's Man.....
VERY Well Done, CH (LTC) Jim Howard
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COL Jason Smallfield, PMP, CFM, CM
116
116
0
Great laydown and history of the BSM but I would like to add a few points:
- It is arguable which award holds the most disdain among Soldiers. BSM is high but may not be the highestest. Other possibly high disdain awards are any of the "breathing" medals awarded by time (NDSM National Defense Service Medal), location (KDSM Korean Defense Service medal), event (HSM Humanitarian Service Medal), or campaign medals (ACMCS, ICMSC). A close second are the service ribbons (Overseas Service Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon). Collectively these awards/ribbons make Soldiers look like WWII Soviet Generals.
- There are a limited number of military awards with only broad definitions for guidance that give a wide amount of latitude to local commanders. The good news is local commanders are given a "band" to operate within but the bad news is that the "shot group" used by the commanders can vary widely.
- The above means there is a consistent effort to add more awards to the military awards. Recent examples include a retirement medal and the medal for UAV pilots that was to have been placed above the BSM in precedence (neither was implemented) along with the CAB which was implemented.
- Why an award was initiated and how it is used now usually differ. Therefore the historical awareness is informative but less useful than one would think. Look at how the Purple Heart and Congressional Medal of Honor have morphed over the years. Change itself is not necessarily a bad thing.
- Rank and responsibility. Many Soldiers (and leaders) equate rank with eligibility for award. By AR this is not true but in application there is some truth to this. For peacetime PCS awards (AAM, ARCOM, MSM, etc) I agree that scope of responsibility should be a criteria of consideration for an award. For combat awards (BSM, SS, etc), however, the act alone and not the rank should be the primary consideration.
- The solution to the award problem (as noted above by the BSM) is not to add more awards but to enable a tighter "shot" group by local commanders when they approve awards at the designated levels.
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Lt Col Anders Bergmann
Lt Col Anders Bergmann
3 y
Not sure the name "Congressional Medal of Honor" is correct. Believe it's just "Medal of Honor". I think the existence of the "Congressional Medal of Honor Society" results in some confusion to the name of the medal itself.
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SSG Bill McCoy
SSG Bill McCoy
>1 y
Good post COL Jason Smallfield, PMP, CFM, CM. I ETS's in Dec of '78 and a soldier, sailor or Marine was considered to have a lot of ribbons with two or three rows. NO OFFENSE intended towards any USAF guys, but back then we always looked at AF guys as getting a ribbon for everything but eating in a mess hall. It wasn't uncommon to see an AF E4 with five or six rows of ribbons.
Today, it looks like soldiers get a ribbon for just about anything and everything - completing training like WLC, and who knows, maybe even brushing their teeth and having a haircut! LOL Reminds me of kids I see in high school Jr. ROTC.
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SSG Photographer/Owner
SSG (Join to see)
5 mo
COL Jason Smallfield, PMP, CFM, CM While I appreciate your POV sir, I must respectfully disagree. I have been in for over 12 years and quite frankly, I'm lucky to have the 9 ribbons I currently do. I can't speak for everyone, but I know for a fact a lot of Soldiers have disdain for awards because an officer and an enlisted person could do the exact same thing, but be given completely different awards. For example, I saw a 2LT get an AAM for running a weapons qualification range for 1 day. Likewise, the SSG who ran it the following day received nothing. AR 600-8-22 states "Rank/Grade will not be a factor in determining the type or level of recognition, nor will any quotas be established limiting the number of awards that may be recommended or approved." However, with that in mind, if you are SSG or below, you'll be lucky to see anything above an AAM. SFC and Above, you'll rarely see anything less than an ARCOM. I got my first AAM for getting 9 Soldiers into the reserves out of the IRR, but they only wanted me to get 5. My second AAM was for being an Acting Platoon Sergeant for 4+ months due to a shortage of NCOs while I was a Specialist. The award system is broken sir. Officers are the approval authority for awards, and they give each other attaboys constantly, while the joes that are doing the majority of the work get their award recommendations downgraded or disapproved. I look forward to hearing your thoughts sir.
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SPC John Reynolds
SPC John Reynolds
3 mo
E4 here, agreeing that an O-4s' greater responsibility should factor into consideration of medals. Think about this, though: should not *even greater* weight be given to those who, with far fewer means / responsibilities, nonetheless achieve similar accomplishments?
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