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Command Post What is this?
Posted on Nov 11, 2021
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
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Responses: 405
SSgt Matthew Lee
What is being done or what can the VA do to help homeless veterans? The numbers seem to be continuing to rise and a large number of them are disabled veterans that need care, medications and treatment.
Lt Col Bill Martin
Lt Col Bill Martin
1 mo
No softball questions here: Mr secretary - thanks for ALL you do for us vets! Do you think MORE could be done - especially for our Homeless Veterans? It APPEARS that the illegal border crossers are getting more 'benefits' than our own Veterans. Housing help. Food help. Child care help. Education help. Medical help. Do you feel like the VA could be using some of those funds for OUR OWN veterans?
LCDR William Higgins [LION1000+]
LCDR William Higgins [LION1000+]
1 mo
I echo the comment above. We have an effort here in Maine to house 100 veterans in 100 days (in the 100 days before Veteran's Day). Can each Continuum of Care in the country receive a similar expansion in HUD-VASH and SSVF programs?
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
17 d
Significant progress has been made to prevent and end Veteran homelessness. The number of Veterans experiencing homelessness in the United States has declined by nearly half since 2010. Additionally, since that time, 914,061 Veterans and their family members have been permanently housed, rapidly rehoused, or prevented from falling into homelessness through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) targeted housing vouchers and VA's homelessness programs. As of November 5, 2021, 85 communities — which includes three states — have effectively ended Veteran homelessness, based on criteria established by VA, HUD, and the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH). To see a full and current list of communities that have achieved an effective end to Veteran homelessness based on these guidelines, go to http://www.va.gov/HOMELESS/endingVetshomelessness.asp.

However, we recognize that there is still more work to be done. A 2020 Government Accountability Office report found that, since 2016, progress towards ending Veteran homelessness has stalled. The HUD Point-in-Time (PIT) Count estimates that on a single night in January 2020, 37,252 Veterans were experiencing homelessness. Not only that, but between 2019 and 2020, the number of Veterans experiencing homelessness increased slightly, by less than one percent (167 more people). This increase was entirely among Veterans staying in unsheltered places (859 more Veterans). We at VA find this pattern concerning. Simply put, to Veteran who has served this country - let alone more than 37,000 on a given night - should experience homelessness.

VA and our partners at HUD are aligning efforts and mobilizing the strength of our two departments to do everything in our power to ensure every Veteran can access safe and stable housing.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
15 d
Cpl Vic Burk
Edited 1 mo ago
Mr. Secretary, I have no complaints about my local V. A. Hospital other than they can be slow with appointments however, many Veterans complain about sub-standard care at many facilities. What and when is the government going to fix this issue? It may in some cases be the difference between life and death. This is even more true with veterans needing mental health services. A Veteran contemplating suicide can't wait two months for a mental health counselors calendar to open up. A phone call to a suicide hotline is nothing compared to an in person visit. (In my opinion)

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Cpl Vic Burk
Cpl Vic Burk
1 mo
SP5 Ishmael Shelton - I hate the hear that Brother but I can guarantee you your case is not unique. My oldest brother attempted a suicide by shooting himself in the head but he lived thirteen years basically brain dead. In his case he refused to accept that he had PTSD and needed help although we all knew he did.
CPT Aaron Kletzing
CPT Aaron Kletzing
1 mo
SP5 Ishmael Shelton I’m sorry for your loss
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
17 d
VA takes timeliness and quality of care very seriously. Independent governmental and non-governmental agencies and research consistently have shown the quality of VHA mental health services is the same as, or better than community programs. But we do not rest on this assurance. VHA maintains both local and national processes for the oversight the mental health quality.

Of 1.2 million Veterans who received VHA mental health services and completed a survey following their appointment, 87% reported they received their appointment on a time and date that worked for them.
Through FY 2021 Q3 Veteran satisfaction data reveal a high level of satisfaction with VA mental health care. The vast majority of responding Veterans reported that they are treated with respect and kindness by VHA mental health staff (95%) and that mental health treatment has been helpful in their life (90%). We share this information broadly and work to continue to improve performance where needed.
The Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans (SAV) Act (Congressional Public Law [PL] 114-2), required an annual, independent evaluation of mental health programs and suicide prevention services carried out by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) beginning in December 2018. The key findings from the most recent report include:
VA mental health and suicide prevention programs are effective at reducing symptoms in the first three months of outpatient treatment, and in the 3-4 months after discharge from a bed program.
VA mental health programs consistently reduce suicidal ideation and attempts in the first three months of treatment.
Veterans who engage in VA mental health services are very satisfied with their care.
Although women entering mental health care are frequently more likely to have experienced suicidal ideation, programs appear equally effective for men and for women at reducing that ideation.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
15 d
SSG Ken Steinhoff
Edited 28 d ago
Will the VA be taking into consideration the high inflation rate this year to give us a bigger cost of living adjustment? Rent alone jump up from $900 to $1,300 That was al most up by 50%. So please tell me getting a bigger adjustment this year.

Just heard on the News that President Biden want to give $450,000 to each parents that had their kid separated from them at the border.

So I guess we will get Screwed again

You do know if I take a 4 year old and have them walk from NY to LA they will take my kids from me, for I am an unfit parent.

But Lets give them that are Invading our country $450,000 for the fun of it
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
18 d
The VA’s annual Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA) is authorized by Congress and is based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Based on the increase in the CPI announced on October 13, 2021, VA beneficiaries will receive a 5.9 percent COLA increase. This is the largest increase in benefits payments since 1982 when the COLA was 8.7 percent.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
11 d

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