Posted on Aug 16, 2014
SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL
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2006 to present

"Army Strong" is the recruiting slogan that is used currently by the United States Army. The composer of the song used in the Army Strong television commercials is Mark Isham.[3]

2001 to 2006
A humvee wrapped with the slogan in April 2006
"Army of One" was a relatively short-lived recruiting slogan. It replaced the popular "Be All You Can Be" and was replaced in 2006 by the new slogan "Army Strong".[4]The Army of One slogan was meant to mean as described Sun Tzu's Art of War in Chapter VI Weak Points and Strong, that you are only as strong as your weakest link,if the enlisted soldiers are not trained by the non commissioned officers,because the officer are not with troops and checkout what they need,a Army is very weak. The reason for the replacement is believed to be[by whom?] that the slogan "Army of One" is contrary to the idea of teamwork.[citation needed] It is unknown whether this slogan was taken directly from the poster for the 1976 Clint Eastwood film The Outlaw Josey Wales, which had "An Army of One" under a drawing of the Josey Wales character. The "One" in the slogan was an acronym, standing for Officers, Non-Commissioned, and Enlisted,[citation needed] the three types of Soldiers in the US Army.

1980 to 2001

Be All (That) You Can Be was the recruiting slogan of the United States Army for over twenty years.[5] This popular slogan was created by Earl Carter while at the advertising firm N. W. Ayer & Son. He was awarded the Outstanding Civilian Service Award for his efforts.[6] In his autobiography Soul of It All, Michael Bolton claims to have sung the jingle in the early 1980s.[7]

1971 to 1980

"Today's Army Wants to Join You" was a recruiting slogan from the 1971 Volunteer Army (Project VOLAR) campaign, which was introduced as the country prepared to transition to an all-volunteer military. When N. W. Ayer & Son, who were engaged by the US Army, believed they felt the army said "Today's Army is changing; we want to meet you half way", the firm came up with that slogan. General William Westmoreland asked "Do we have to ask it that way?" but agreed to the campaign. The slogan was replaced by "Join the People Who've Joined the Army" in 1973, which later evolved into "This is the Army."[8]

Slogan was written in 1971 by Ted Regan Jr., Executive Vice President and Executive Creative Director of N.W. Ayer, the Army's ad agency. Regan also wrote the follow up slogan, "Join the people who've joined the Army."

Circa 1950s–1971
"Look Sharp, Be Sharp, Go Army!"was a recruiting slogan in the 1950s and 1960s. The Big Picture,[disambiguation needed] public announcements on broadcast television, and highway roadway signs advertised the slogan during a time of a national draft of young men 18 to 34 years of age. The advantage of volunteering for Service, vice being drafted, was choosing the career field you wanted to serve and/or first unit or location of assignment.

World War I
"I Want YOU for US Army" featured on a poster of Uncle Sam painted by James Montgomery Flagg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slogans_of_the_United_States_Army

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-Mc1uQW8RI
Edited 24 d ago
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SP5 Michael Rathbun
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Hmm... if you are talking about words to get the recruits in the door, then the slogan of my era was

"Greeting:

You are hereby ordered for induction into the Armed Forces of the United States..."
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SP5 Michael Rathbun
SP5 Michael Rathbun
11 mo
One of those things that you tend to hold on to. Mine got a bit wrinkled over the years.
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SPC Bill Goodreau
SPC Bill Goodreau
10 mo
I remember my invitation as well. I sometimes tell civilian friends that I once received a personal, written invitation from the President of the United States!!! After they are impressed, I let them off the hook and tell them it was my draft notice!
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MSG Biran Colwell
MSG Biran Colwell
6 mo
If you went in between 1950-11971, the Slogan was "Look Sharp, Be Sharp, Go Army!"
Thanks to all who have Served.
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MSG Biran Colwell
MSG Biran Colwell
6 mo
1950-1971, My Bad.
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GySgt Wayne A. Ekblad
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Edited 4 y ago
93192dd4
United States Marine Corps (1975)
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GySgt Wayne A. Ekblad
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Sgt Tom Cunnally
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SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL
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Sgt Nick Marshall
Sgt Nick Marshall
>1 y
The truth is always best :)
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SFC Drill Sergeant
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Edited 5 y ago
I joined when it was Army of one. I have to admit "be all you can be" was the best marketing slogan that the army had.
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SGT(P) Bryon Sergent
SGT(P) Bryon Sergent
5 y
I also was Be all You Can Be.
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SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL
SFC Joe S. Davis Jr., MSM, DSL
5 y
Roger that, I say hooha
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SSG Patrick Berardicurti
SSG Patrick Berardicurti
>1 y
I was and always will be all you can be. The new slogans are junk in my opinion.
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