Posted on Nov 30, 2015
PO2 Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical)
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Currently still AD. I am at 8.5 years active time year group 2008. I want to do a tour in the reserves while finishing up school for about 5-6 years. I then want to switch back to active to finish my 20 years active time for retirement. Also will I still be under the old pension if I do this route? Will this work?
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PO1 Information Systems Technician
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Have you checked into the Career Intermission Program? Link is below...

I couldn't recommend the route you're thinking of... I know too many sailors sitting in the reserves chomping at the bit to rejoin the fleet but there's no billets open for them....

http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/21st_century_sailor/tflw/pages/cipp.aspx
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PO1 Information Systems Technician
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2 months for every month away from the service and from my understanding, you can use a plethora of reasons for taking CIP, family included. The service member and dependants keep their medical benefits, base access including commissary/NEX, and you get paid 1/30th of your base pay twice a month...

PO1 Thomas Jenkins
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PO1 Hospital Corpsman
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Commissioning is also a good option for you. There's programs that would allow you to go to college with a guarantee hat you will be commissioned.
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CDR Acquisition Officer
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It CAN work, but lime many others have already noted, it all depend on timing and needs of the service. I served on Active Duty after graduating from the Naval Academy for 11 years, then got out and joined the Selected Reserves. After drilling for 8 years in the reserves (and getting promoted twice along the way), the Navy advertised for an opportunity to permanently recall a limited number of Supply Corps officers based on their needs at the time. This was probably related to the large number of IA demands on Supply Corps officers at the time (2007), although they didn't explicitly state so. I applied, was selected, and returned to full time Active Duty (not FTS) at my current rank that I was promoted to in the reserves. Next year I will retire from Active Duty with 20 years of active service, 28 years total service. All of the time that I spent on Active Duty while in the reserves, i.e. that "2 weeks per year", counts toward meeting the 20 years, but drill weekend (inactive time) doesn't. However, the inactive time WILL count when computing retirement pay - it hust doesn't count for eligibility to retire from active duty.
The key will be the needs of the Navy at the time that you want to return to AD. You will have to be flexible with regards to location, and potentially the need to change rate to where the demand is. I would recommend researching the career intermission program, as I believe it guarantees your return to Active Duty. However, I don't believe it will allow you to be gone for as long as 5 to 6 years - I think 3 years is the max.
Good luck and best wishes!
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CMDCM Richard Moon
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Have you actually thought this through? The Reserve force is very different from active (I know this as my wife is a SELRES with 37 years of service, most of it as a SELRES). You are looking at derailing your career with such a disjointed plan. With the current climate on downsizing (it's been a near constant feature of service since the mid-90's) you are unlikely to be able to return to active duty. Is it possible? Sure, Likely? No. Requiring 5-6 years to finish up school? Some tough talk here - are you kidding me? If you need to go to school to start an undergrad from scratch, you need to get it done in 3-4 years. Forget the "pension" plan. That is honestly the least of your worries. It's what you plan to do that fits in with the Navy's needs. If your intent is to get a commission? Or just get a degree? Ever think about high year tenure issues with your current TIS? I think you had better talk with someone over what you're really looking for. It's not at all clear here what you really want.
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