Avatar feed
Responses: 10
LTC Stephen F.
14
14
0
Edited 2 y ago
A5c281f9
0e794916
069af4ed
5951e7b0
Thank you my friend SGT (Join to see) for making us aware that on September 14, 1901, Theodore Roosevelt was sworn in as the youngest man to serve as United States President after William McKinley died after an anarchist shot him in Buffalo.


Theodore Roosevelt and the Western Experience
Produced in 1991 by KSPS Public Television, Theodore Roosevelt and the Western Experience examines the 26th president of the United States, in an hour long documentary that was resurrected from our archives.
https://youtu.be/e_lc4th0w7I?t=36

Images;
1. President Teddy Roosevelt at the White House in 1908
2. Teddy Roosevelt and his regiment of Rough Riders, after capturing Kettle Hill. 1898
3. Portrait of the Roosevelt family taken by Pach Brothers Standing l-to-r_Kermit Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt III. Seated l-t-r_Quentin Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt, Archie Roosevelt, First Lady Edith Roosevelt, Ethel Roosevelt.
4. Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), was the 26th President of the United States (1901-1909) and a tireless champion of the preservation of National Parks in North America

Background from [https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/theodore-roosevelt/]
With the assassination of President William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, not quite 43, became the 26th and youngest President in the Nation’s history (1901-1909). He brought new excitement and power to the office, vigorously leading Congress and the American public toward progressive reforms and a strong foreign policy.
________________________________________
With the assassination of President McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, not quite 43, became the youngest President in the Nation’s history. He brought new excitement and power to the Presidency, as he vigorously led Congress and the American public toward progressive reforms and a strong foreign policy.
He took the view that the President as a “steward of the people” should take whatever action necessary for the public good unless expressly forbidden by law or the Constitution.” I did not usurp power,” he wrote, “but I did greatly broaden the use of executive power.”
Roosevelt’s youth differed sharply from that of the log cabin Presidents. He was born in New York City in 1858 into a wealthy family, but he too struggled–against ill health–and in his triumph became an advocate of the strenuous life.
In 1884 his first wife, Alice Lee Roosevelt, and his mother died on the same day. Roosevelt spent much of the next two years on his ranch in the Badlands of Dakota Territory. There he mastered his sorrow as he lived in the saddle, driving cattle, hunting big game–he even captured an outlaw. On a visit to London, he married Edith Carow in December 1886.
During the Spanish-American War, Roosevelt was lieutenant colonel of the Rough Rider Regiment, which he led on a charge at the battle of San Juan. He was one of the most conspicuous heroes of the war.
Boss Tom Platt, needing a hero to draw attention away from scandals in New York State, accepted Roosevelt as the Republican candidate for Governor in 1898. Roosevelt won and served with distinction.
As President, Roosevelt held the ideal that the Government should be the great arbiter of the conflicting economic forces in the Nation, especially between capital and labor, guaranteeing justice to each and dispensing favors to none.
Roosevelt emerged spectacularly as a “trust buster” by forcing the dissolution of a great railroad combination in the Northwest. Other antitrust suits under the Sherman Act followed.
Roosevelt steered the United States more actively into world politics. He liked to quote a favorite proverb, “Speak softly and carry a big stick. . . . ”
Aware of the strategic need for a shortcut between the Atlantic and Pacific, Roosevelt ensured the construction of the Panama Canal. His corollary to the Monroe Doctrine prevented the establishment of foreign bases in the Caribbean and arrogated the sole right of intervention in Latin America to the United States.
He won the Nobel Peace Prize for mediating the Russo-Japanese War, reached a Gentleman’s Agreement on immigration with Japan, and sent the Great White Fleet on a goodwill tour of the world.
Some of Theodore Roosevelt’s most effective achievements were in conservation. He added enormously to the national forests in the West, reserved lands for public use, and fostered great irrigation projects.
He crusaded endlessly on matters big and small, exciting audiences with his high-pitched voice, jutting jaw, and pounding fist. “The life of strenuous endeavor” was a must for those around him, as he romped with his five younger children and led ambassadors on hikes through Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C.
Leaving the Presidency in 1909, Roosevelt went on an African safari, then jumped back into politics. In 1912 he ran for President on a Progressive ticket. To reporters he once remarked that he felt as fit as a bull moose, the name of his new party.
While campaigning in Milwaukee, he was shot in the chest by a fanatic. Roosevelt soon recovered, but his words at that time would have been applicable at the time of his death in 1919: “No man has had a happier life than I have led; a happier life in every way.”
The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association."


Col Carl Whicker COL (Join to see) SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth MSgt Robert "Rock" Aldi Maj Robert Thornton PO1 William "Chip" Nagel SP5 Dennis Loberger TSgt David L. TSgt Joe C. Maj Marty Hogan CPT Paul Whitmer Maj Bill Smith, Ph.D. SSG Stephen Rogerson SCPO Morris Ramsey SGT Denny Espinosa SGT Steve McFarland PO1 H Gene Lawrence PVT Mark Zehner Cpl (Join to see)
(14)
Comment
(0)
LTC Stephen F.
LTC Stephen F.
2 y
F76add62
D334165a
78ddd665
E6e59d1f
That Time Teddy Roosevelt Got Shot in the Chest But Gave a 90 Minute Speech Anyway
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnfBDO1gBOM

Images:
1. Colonel Theodore Roosevelt in Cuba- 1898
2. in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Theodore Roosevelt, the presidential candidate for the Progressive Party, is shot at close range by saloonkeeper John Schrank while greeting the public
3. Bloodstained shirt worn by President Theodore Roosevelt, photographed following an assassination attempt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1912.
4. October 14, 1912 'Having suffered only a flesh wound from the attack, Theodore Roosevelt went on to deliver his remarks with the bullet lodged in his body.
5. John Schrank in county jail

Background from {[https://www.politico.com/story/2016/10/roosevelt-shot-in-milwaukee-oct-14-1912-229570]}
POLITICO biography of John Schrank former President Theodore Roosevelt
By Derek Robertson
On this day in 1912, a saloonkeeper named John Schrank shot former President Theodore Roosevelt while Roosevelt, as the presidential candidate of the Progressive Party, prepared to give a campaign speech in Milwaukee, Wis.
The force of Schrank’s bullet, aimed directly at Roosevelt's heart, was slowed by a steel eyeglass case and a copy of his campaign speech stuffed in the breast pocket of his heavy coat. After being arrested, Schrank gave as his motive for the shooting his belief that "any man looking for a third term ought to be shot."
Story Continued Below
Having suffered only a flesh wound from the attack, Roosevelt went on to deliver his scheduled speech with the bullet still lodged in his body.
After speaking a few words, the one-time "Rough Rider" pulled a torn and bloodstained manuscript from his breast pocket and declared, "You see, it takes more than one bullet to kill a bull moose." (The Progressives were popularly known as the "Bull Moose Party,” which got its name after Roosevelt had earlier told reporters, "I'm as fit as a bull moose.”)
Roosevelt spoke for nearly an hour before being taken to the hospital. Doctors determined that he was not seriously wounded and that it would be more dangerous to attempt to remove the bullet than to leave it in his chest. Roosevelt carried it with him until he died in 1919.
Slowed, however, in his campaign endeavors by the wound, Roosevelt, who had served as the nation’s 26th president from 1901 to 1909, lost to Democrat Woodrow Wilson in a three-way race in November. Roosevelt’s candidacy may have denied the incumbent Republican nominee, William Howard Taft, who took office as a Roosevelt protégé, his bid to serve a second term. Schrank was subsequently deemed insane and committed to a mental hospital, where he died in 1943.

FYI MAJ Dale E. Wilson, Ph.D. PO1 William "Chip" Nagel SPC Margaret Higgins SPC Nancy Greene SGT Jim ArnoldMSG Andrew WhiteSSG Robert Mark Odom LTC Jeff Shearer SGT Philip RoncariCWO3 Dennis M. SFC William Farrell SPC Nancy GreeneSSG Franklin Briant1stsgt Glenn Brackin Sgt Kelli Mays SPC Matthew LambSSG Robert "Rob" WentworthCapt Rich BuckleyCW4 G.L. SmithSPC Russ Bolton SSG Donald H "Don" Bates
(3)
Reply
(0)
SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
2 y
Thank you for the great share LTC Stephen F.
(2)
Reply
(0)
SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
2 y
LTC Stephen F. - Thank for the share and mention sir.
(1)
Reply
(0)
COL State Dental Officer
COL (Join to see)
2 y
Thanks for the mention LTC Stephen F..
(2)
Reply
(0)
Avatar small
Lt Col Charlie Brown
12
12
0
Good share. He was a very complicated man
(12)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small
SGT David A. 'Cowboy' Groth
9
9
0
Excellent history share brother SGT (Join to see)
(9)
Comment
(0)
Avatar small

Join nearly 2 million former and current members of the US military, just like you.

close